Sunday, November 27, 2016

MapCarte 264/365: Plan oblique relief Europe by Jonas Buddeberg, Bernhard Jenny & Johannes Liem, 2014

MapCarte 264/365: Plan oblique relief Europe by Jonas Buddeberg, Bernhard Jenny & Johannes Liem, 2014

Click the image to view the web map Representation of terrain is as old as cartography itself and there remain numerous ways of creating interesting effects. Plan oblique can be traced back to the work of Xaver Imfeld in 1887 (featured in MapCarte 182).

MapCarte 343/365: A deliniation of the strata of England and Wales by William Smith, 1815

MapCarte 343/365: A deliniation of the strata of England and Wales by William Smith, 1815

In a world where many seem rather quick to suggest their map is 'the first to show...' it's refreshing to be able to show actual firsts from the world of cartography that exhibit good design. English geologist William Smith is credited as the first to have created a nationwide geological map.

MapCarte 94/365: Wood charts by Below the Boat, 2013

MapCarte 94/365: Wood charts by Below the Boat, 2013

Physical models, for instance in the form of globes and vacuum-formed raised relief vinyl maps have been staple ways to depict the world for centuries. They bring a three-dimensional quality to the map that allows us to more clearly see how a landscape looks.

MapCarte 58/365: Karte der Gegend um den Walensee by Eduard Imhof, 1938.


This original image measures 9.6m in width and illustrates he area around Walensee at 1:10,000. Created by Eduard Imhof, the work appeared in his classic text Cartographic Relief Representation which had a single purpose in teaching the means by which to represent relief in maps. This is a painting in gouache that Imhof used to show a plan view portrayal as naturally as possible.
Imhof employed the techniques of a landscape painter. All linear elements that might be produced using woodcuts, etchings, engraving or lithography are removed since they are abstract and do not appear in a natural landscape. No aerial photographs or existing maps were used as underlay. The result is a beautiful, aesthetically pleasing impressionistic painting yet one that is highly accurate.

As Imhof himself explained “In detail, the interplay of surface colour, vegetation colour, light and shadow, of reflections and aerial perspective are shown. According to their location and the basic tint of the ground or ground cover, the shadow tones are India red, brown, grey, blue or deep green. Contrast effects also play their part. Even shadows are often lightened and varied in colour by reflected light, but cast shadows are strongly deepened. A slope bathed in sunlight appears bright ochre or yellowish red, but in shadow it is a deep red violet. In a large scale portrayal such as this, with its simple and powerful relief forms, the coloured mosaic of ground cover influences the colour of the depth effects but does not destroy them”


The virtual library of Eduard Imhof is here.

Monday, November 14, 2016

10 Mysterious Images That Appear Across The Ancient World

10 Mysterious Images That Appear Across The Ancient World - Listverse

Mysteries The ancient world remains shrouded in mystery, with records and artifacts shining a limited light on our ancestors. Oddly, certain motifs seem popular in many ancient societies. However, no one can say for sure how they spread or what exactly they mean.

10 Forgotten Stories From Ancient America's Great War

10 Forgotten Stories From Ancient America's Great War - Listverse

History These days, much of the history of the Americas before Europeans arrived has been lost or forgotten. This is a shame because the great civilizations of Central America hold stories as epic and intriguing as those of Ancient Greece and Rome.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Behold the Most Amazing D&D Map Ever Created!

Behold the Most Amazing D&D Map Ever Created! | Nerdist

In my youth, we never used very many maps when playing Dungeons & Dragons. The maps provided in the game sets felt flat (because they were) and boring, and simple graph paper could do in a pinch if you need to really block out some area of effect or accurate combat distances.